A Stretching and Foam Rolling for Runners Routine

There is a ton of information out there addressing things like training, supplementation and best practices, in terms of what you should do before a workout. It can be overwhelming trying to sift through it all and figure out what works best for you. Each of us has unique needs and what works for me may not work for you. Here’s what the latest research says about two of the most important things you can do before a workout: hydration and fuel.
Tight, sore muscles are common after running, which makes recovery a super important part of any training program. And this foam rolling for runners routine—which starts off with some dynamic stretching moves that feel amazing—is a great way to fit that recovery into your regular schedule.
In this running recovery workout video, which is the final installment of Sweat With SELF’s Fitness for Runners series, you’ll spend extra time giving your muscles some TLC. Rhandi Orme, a certified run coach and personal trainer, and trainer Quan Bailey lead you through a routine that starts with dynamic stretches that will help work out the kinks from tightened muscles and finish with foam rolling moves to really dig deeper at any knots that remain.
In the dynamic stretching portion, you’ll cycle through moves that loosen up your leg muscles, including your quads and glutes, as well as your upper-body muscles, such as your thoracic spine, and your core. All of these muscles can feel tight and sore after a run, so spending some time taking them through gentle ranges of motion can help them loosen up.
Then you’ll end with the foam rolling portion of the running recovery video. We get it: Foam rolling can be intimidating—and maybe a little uncomfortable. That’s why Orme and Bailey will take you through beginner-friendly options (as well as suggest modifications) for foam rolling moves to release tension in your back, IT band, quadriceps, hamstrings, and calves. With foam rolling, you want to pause at a point in your body where you feel a knot—holding it there helps you feel a release, which not only feels great but also helps improve your mobility. (Just make sure to keep the pressure from the foam roller off your bones and joints, and on your muscles.)
Ready for a stretching and foam rolling for runners recovery routine that takes just 20 minutes? Grab a mat and get ready to work out those knots.
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